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Mushrooms (Fungus)


Beatle On Orange Grisette Mushroom
Orange Grisette
Aminita corocea
(Species)
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Birds Nest Fungus
Birds Nest Mushroom
Cyathus olla
(Species)
Birds Nest Mushrooms are usually very small. The "eggs" of this species are considered large at up to 3.5mm. The cup is about 1cm wide at the top.
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Coprinus Mushroom About To Wilt
Umbrella Inky Cap
Coprinus
(Genus)
These small mushrooms, which appeared overnight after a rain, were all fallen over by the time I put the camera away.
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Elegant Stinkhorn Top With Flies
Elegant Stinkhorn
Mutinus elegans
(Species)
You are likely to smell the well named Stinkhorns before you see them. They have a very distinctive and unpleasant odor that attracts flies to the spore containing slime.

There are many common species of Stinkhorns with some striking weird forms. See: http://mushroomexpert.com/mutinus_elegans.html

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Colorfull Polypore
Turkey-tail Polypore
Trametes versicolor
(Species)
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Black Morel
Black Morel
Morchella elata
(Species)
The morels are the best known and loved edible mushroom in the United States and the Black Morel is one of the most common. There are many people who collect and eat Morels who would not consider eating any other wild mushroom. They are highly prized by mushroom hunters who often keep their collecting sites secret. The season in the southeast is usually limited to a week or so in the spring (There are some that appear in the summer at higher elevations.) If you spot one you should get down on your hands and knees and search all around for others as the are often in groups but are very hard to spot among the leaf litter where they are often found. Like most wild mushrooms they should be cooked before eating and some people have gastric problems after eating them especially if consumed with alcohol but this is rare. Serious poisoning is not likely.

There are several other species of Morel and the study of these is ongoing. Visit the Mushroomexpert.com to learn more about all types of mushrooms and to participate in the Morel Data Collection Project. Morels collected from locations across North America are DNA tested to establish species.

Do not confuse morels with False Morels! They may look similar but False Morels are not pitted but merely wrinkled and poisonous.

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Cedar Apple Rust Fungus Fruting
Eastern Red Cedar
Junipers virginiana
(Species)
Cedar Apple Rust
Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae
(Species)
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Puffball Mushrooms On Downed Hickory Tree
Puffball
Morganella pyriformis
(Species)
Shagbark Hickory
Carya ovata
(Species)
While puffballs are edible when young (and cooked) and the flesh is entirely white inside at this stage they would be tough, foul tasting and most likely toxic. They can provide some entertainment as by poking them you can release clouds of spores that look like smoke.

See: http://mushroomexpert.com/morganella_pyriformis.html

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Oyster Mushrooms
Oyster Mushroom
Pleurotus ostreatus
(Species)
This common edible mushroom is usually found on logs or living trees in cool weather after days of rain (or alternately on your grocer's shelf). There is some variability in the color of the top some being brownish and some nearly white and many are oyster colored. The gills run down to a short, wide, off center stem. If they are collected when the temperature is above about 45 degrees F. you are likely to find insects in the flesh. You may note a distinct smell from fresh oyster mushrooms that is neither pleasant or unpleasant.

See: http://mushroomexpert.com/pleurotus_ostr eatus.htm

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Tiny Orange Mushroom And Moss
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Stalked Puffball Mushrooms, Stalkball, Tulostoma sp.
Stalkball
Tulostoma
(Genus)
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Tooth Fungus Near Poplar Spring Campsite
Coral Tooth Fungus
Hericium coralloides
(Species)
This lovely fungus grows on dead trees and has short teeth (less than 1cm). This specimen was almost a large as a man's head and there were a couple of smaller ones near by on the same log.
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© 2008 Daniel W Reed
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